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In a landmark decision, Justice Catherine Bruce of the Supreme Court of British Columbia, Canada rejected the guilty verdict by the Local Court for a Canadian couple, and called the plot a ‘police-manufactured crime’.

Supreme Court of British Columbia, Canada

Supreme Court of British Columbia, Canada

John Nuttall, 41, and Amanda Korody, 33, a couple converted to Islam were found guilty of terror charges last year after they planted inert pressure cooker bombs on the steps of British Columbia’s provincial legislature in 2013, ahead of Canada Day celebrations that drew thousands of visitors to the area. However, the Court ruled the pair was entrapped and manipulated by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) into carrying out a “police-manufactured crime”.

“This was a clear case of police-manufactured crime…. The world has enough terrorists. We do not need the police to create more out of marginalized people.”

In the Case of R vs. Nuttall, 2016 BCSC 1404 (Read the Full Verdict), Justice Katherine said “The defendants also demonstrated that they were not very intelligent, gullible and quite naive and child-like.” Nuttall and Korody were dependent on social assistance to get by as they struggled to overcome emotional and addiction issues.

The judge accepted the argument of the defense Lawyers that the couple had been entrapped during a five-month undercover police sting operation named Operation Souvenir, which involved some 240 police officers, who billed $900,000 in overtime alone.

“Without the police it would have been impossible for the defendants to carry out the pressure-cooker plan … The police decided they had to aggressively engineer and plan for Nuttall and Korody and make them think it was their own,” said Bruce. “The defendants were the foot soldiers but the undercover officer was the leader of the group.”

John Nuttall, left, and Amanda Korody wait for a taxi at B.C. Supreme Court after a judge ruled the couple were entrapped by the RCMP in a police-manufactured crime, in Vancouver on Friday, July 29, 2016. DARRYL DYCK / THE CANADIAN PRESS

John Nuttall, left, and Amanda Korody wait for a taxi at B.C. Supreme Court after a judge ruled the couple were entrapped by the RCMP in a police-manufactured crime, in Vancouver on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by DARRYL DYCK / THE CANADIAN PRESS

She called Nuttall and Korody “not very intelligent; gullible and quite naive and childlike. To say they were unsophisticated is generous.”

However, within hours of their release, four Vancouver police cruisers screeched to a halt and the couple was taken away in handcuffs again. Late in the afternoon, they went before B.C. provincial court Judge Reg Harris and agreed to peace bond terms that included geographic restrictions banning them from the legislature grounds, Canadian Forces Bases, synagogues and Jewish schools. They were then released.

Source: The Guardian and The Vancouver Sun

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